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Virtual Reality — Jeremy Bailenson, The #GSPodcast

Bailenson talks about his new book ‘Experience On Demand: What Virtual Reality Is, How It Works, and What It Can Do’. The future of VR technology is an exciting one. Where will it lead us? How can it help us? And what are some of the concerns?
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Experience on Demand, Talks at Google

With well-crafted simulations, virtual experiences, which are so immersive that the brain believes they’re real, are already widely available with a VR headset and will only become more accessible and commonplace. But how does this new medium affect its users, and does it have a future beyond fantasy and escapism? Talk given by Jeremy Bailenson.
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How to create empathy in VR, WIRED

In his WIRED opinion piece, Prof. Jeremy Bailenson discusses the growing body of scientific evidence showing that creating empathy in virtual reality is more successful if the headset wearer moves around.
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Virtual reality comes of age, Nature

As a leading researcher in the field, Jeremy Bailenson crafts new worlds that feel real, to explore their beneficial uses. In Experience On Demand, he tours the myriad applications that he and others are developing.
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The Trials and Tribulations of Narrative in VR, mediaX

From the October 24th mediaX Sensing and Tracking for 3D Narratives Conference, Jeremy Bailenson looks at the Ocean Acidification Project that allows users to stand in heavy traffic and follow carbon dioxide molecules from car tailpipes to the sea, where they are absorbed.
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Using Virtual Reality to Avoid Catastrophe, Popular Science

VHIL researchers hope to make their virtual reality "field trip" a vital conservation tool, aiming to give its "travelers" as real an experience as possible. The goal is to get people to understand in a visceral way what climate change is doing to the oceans.
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Can VR Really Make You More Empathetic?, Wired

VR scenarios could be more effective than the traditional public service ad at making people behave. Afterwards, they waste less paper. They save more money for retirement. They’re nicer to the people around them.
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